Honeybee venom kills aggressive breast cancer cells

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Molecule In Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells In Lab

So many scholars are working on the studies which beneficial for the well-being of humankind. Some findings of those researches directly impact medical issues, which need to update all the time. Recently few scholars were able to find out a treatment for two cancer types, which are hard to treat: triple-negative and HER2-enriched.

This study goes over how honeybee venom could be able to induce cancer death in hard to treat. Bee venom has been identified as containing anti-cancer properties against melanoma. So the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research in Western Australia studies further about bee venom, and it works perfectly.

Molecule In Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells In Lab
Molecule In Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells In Lab

Many tests work perfectly in a lab setting, but few can be produced as a treatment for humans. While we don’t use bee venom as treatment right now, perhaps in the future, it may end up being used as exactly that.

Molecule In Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells In Lab

The abstract of this study goes as follows:

Despite decades of study, the molecular mechanisms and selectivity of the biomolecular components of honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom as anticancer agents remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that honeybee venom and its major component melittin potently induce cell death, particularly in the aggressive triple-negative and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. Honeybee venom and melittin suppress the activation of EGFR and HER2 by interfering with the phosphorylation of these receptors in the plasma membrane of breast carcinoma cells. Mutational studies reveal that a positively charged C-terminal melittin sequence mediates plasma membrane interaction and anticancer activity. Engineering of an RGD motif further enhances targeting of melittin to malignant cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. Lastly, administration of melittin enhances the effect of docetaxel in suppressing breast tumor growth in an allograft model. Our work unveils a molecular mechanism underpinning the anticancer selectivity of melittin, and outlines treatment strategies to target aggressive breast cancers.

Molecule In Honeybee Venom Destroys Breast Cancer Cells In Lab

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Source: BBC | Science | Nature

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